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“Dr. Ortega gave me a second
chance for a pain free life!”

– Jack Mason, Actual Patient

Dr. Gil Ortega, a pioneer in Anterior Hip Replacement

Dr. Ortega may recommend various non-surgical therapies prior to a hip replacement if needed. An appropriate weight reduction program may be beneficial in decreasing force across the hip joint. However, weight reduction can be difficult for people with hip arthritis since the arthritis pain precludes them from increasing their activity and burning calories. An exercise program may be instituted to improve the strength and flexibility of the hip and the other lower extremity joints

 

“Dr. Ortega gave me a second
chance for a pain free life!”

– Jack Mason, Actual Patient

Dr. Gil Ortega, a pioneer in Anterior Hip Replacement

Dr. Ortega may recommend various non-surgical therapies prior to a hip replacement if needed. An appropriate weight reduction program may be beneficial in decreasing force across the hip joint. However, weight reduction can be difficult for people with hip arthritis since the arthritis pain precludes them from increasing their activity and burning calories. An exercise program may be instituted to improve the strength and flexibility of the hip and the other lower extremity joints

 

ABOUT DR ORTEGA

Chief of Orthopaedic Surgery, Honor Health Scottsdale Osborn Trauma Center, January 2015-2017
Orthopaedic Trauma Director, Mayo Clinic Arizona Orthopaedic Residency Program, March 2015-Present
Adjunct Associate Professor of Orthopaedics, Mayo Clinic March 2015-Present
Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Arizona College of Medicine-Phoenix April 2014-Present
Co-Director, Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship, Sonoran Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeons, August 2008-Present
Sports Medicine Advisory Team Orthopaedic Consultant, Arizona State University (ASU) August 2010-Present
Clinical Instructor, ASU College of Nursing and Healthcare Innovation August 2010-Present
Clinical Assistant Professor, Division of Clinical Education, Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine (AZCOM) August 2009-Present

DR. ORTEGA

Dr. Ortega Has Over 25 Years Experience

Dr. Ortega’s interest in orthopaedic surgery began when he was an orthopaedic patient. While playing West Texas football, he suffered a multi-ligament knee injury that required multiple surgeries. He credits the outstanding care of his orthopaedic surgeon and physical therapists in his return to sports and in his desire to be an orthopaedic surgeon.

While he was an undergraduate, Dr. Ortega explored his clinical interests in medicine by participating in two prestigious summer research fellowships at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital. His research included key investigations into basic science issues that have evolved into clinical medical breakthroughs.

PROCEDURES

Anterior Hip Replacement

Arthritis of the hip is a disease that wears away the cartilage between the femoral head and the hip socket (acetabulum). Secondary to the arthritis, the two bony areas may bone on bone. When this happens, the joint erodes and becomes less functional. The result is pain, stiffness and instability. In some cases, motion of the leg may be greatly restricted. There are two main types of arthritis: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Fracture Nonunion

Most broken bones (fractures) heal without major issues. Occasionally, some fractures do not heal even when they get the best surgical or nonsurgical treatment. In some cases, certain risk factors make it more likely that a bone will fail to heal such as smoking, medications, and/or some medical conditions such as diabetes. When a broken bone fails to heal it is called a “nonunion.” A “delayed union” is when a fracture takes longer than usual to heal. Most bones heal within 4-6 months.

Shoulder Replacement

Arthritis of the shoulder is a disease that wears away the cartilage between the humeral head and the shoulder socket (glenoid). Secondary to the arthritis, the two bony areas may bone on bone. When this happens, the joint erodes and becomes less functional. The result is pain, stiffness and instability. In some cases, motion of the shoulder may be greatly restricted. There are two main types of arthritis: osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Fractures

A fracture is also known as a broken bone. A bone can be fractured “broken” in any many different manners.
Types of Fractures
Bones are generally rigid, and are able to bend when an outside force is applied. However, if the force is too strong, the bones will break, just as a tree branch breaks when it is bent too far.

Patient Education

Hip Arthritis

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the United States. Osteoarthritis is degenerative and although it most often occurs in patients over the age of 50, it can occur at any age, especially if the joint is in some way damaged.

Osteoarthritis occurs commonly in the large weight-bearing joints of the lower extremities, including the hips and knees, but may affect the spine and upper extremity joints as well. Patients with osteoarthritis often develop large bone spurs, or osteophytes, around the joint, that may further limit motion.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that results in joint pain, stiffness and swelling and differs from osteoarthritis

The disease process leads to severe deterioration of multiple joints, resulting in severe pain and loss of function.

cAUSES

Osteoarthritis of the hip is a condition commonly referred to as “wear and tear” arthritis. Although the degenerative process may accelerate in persons with a previous hip injury, many cases of osteoarthritis occur when the hip simply wears out.

Some experts believe there may be a genetic predisposition in people who develop osteoarthritis of the hip. Abnormalities of the hip due to previous fractures or childhood disorders may also lead to a degenerative hip. Osteoarthritis of the hip is the most common cause for total hip replacement surgery.

cAUSES

Although the exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis is unknown, some experts believe that a virus or bacteria may trigger the disease in people having a genetic predisposition to rheumatoid arthritis.

Many doctors think rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the synovial tissue of the joint is attacked by one’s own immune system. The onset of rheumatoid arthritis occurs most frequently in middle age and can be more common among women.

sYMPTOmS

The most common symptom of osteoarthritis is pain in the hip or groin area during weight bearing activities such as walking. People with hip pain usually compensate by limping, or reducing the force on the arthritic hip.

As a result of the cartilage degeneration, the hip loses its flexibility and strength, and may result in the formation of bone spurs. Finally, as the condition worsens, the pain may be present at all times, even during non weight-bearing activities.

SYMPTOMS

The primary symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis are similar to osteoarthritis and include pain, swelling and the loss of motion.

In addition, other symptoms may include loss of appetite, fever, energy loss, anemia, and rheumatoid nodules (lumps of tissue under the skin). People suffering with rheumatoid arthritis commonly have periods of exacerbation or “flare ups” where multiple joints may be painful and stiff.

tREATMENT

Dr. Ortega doctor may recommend various non-surgical therapies prior to a hip replacement if needed. An appropriate weight reduction program may be beneficial in decreasing force across the hip joint.

However, weight reduction can be difficult for people with hip arthritis since the arthritis pain precludes them from increasing their activity and burning calories. An exercise program may be instituted to improve the strength and flexibility of the hip and the other lower extremity joints. Lifestyle and activity modification may be undertaken in an attempt to minimize the activities that are associated with hip pain. Various medications such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and/or nutritional supplements (Chondroitin/Glucosamine) may reduce pain and inflammation associated arthritis.

Assistive devices like a cane or a crutch may help to reduce the forces transmitted through the hip joint during walking, which may help decrease hip arthritis pain. If non-surgical treatment is unsuccessful, Dr. Ortega may help you decide that a total hip replacement is the best available treatment option.

TREATMENT

Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis may involve medications such as NSAIDs, aspirin and analgesics. Corticosteroids, such as prednisone may be prescribed, and are effective in decreasing the inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

Side effects can occur with the use of corticosteroids, and close monitoring by a physician is essential. If non-surgical measures fail, Dr. Ortega may help you decide that total hip replacement is the best treatment option to relieve your pain and help you return to an improved functional level.

Shoulder Arthritis

Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is the most common form of arthritis in the United States. Osteoarthritis is degenerative and although it most often occurs in patients over the age of 50, it can occur at any age, especially if the joint is in some way damaged.

Osteoarthritis occurs commonly in the large weight-bearing joints of the lower extremities, including the hips and knees, but may affect the spine and upper extremity joints as well. Patients with osteoarthritis often develop large bone spurs, or osteophytes, around the joint, that may further limit motion.

Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that results in joint pain, stiffness and swelling and differs from osteoarthritis.

The disease process leads to severe deterioration of multiple joints, resulting in severe pain and loss of function.

CAUSES

Osteoarthritis of the shoulder is a condition commonly referred to as “wear and tear” arthritis. Although the degenerative process may accelerate in persons with a previous shoulder injury, many cases of osteoarthritis occur when the hip simply wears out.

Some experts believe there may be a genetic predisposition in people who develop osteoarthritis of the shoulder. Abnormalities of the shoulder due to previous fractures or childhood disorders may also lead to a degenerative shoulder. Osteoarthritis of the shoulder is the most common cause for total shoulder replacement surgery.

CAUSES

Although the exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis is unknown, some experts believe that a virus or bacteria may trigger the disease in people having a genetic predisposition to rheumatoid arthritis.

Many doctors think rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease in which the synovial tissue of the joint is attacked by one’s own immune system. The onset of rheumatoid arthritis occurs most frequently in middle age and can be more common among women.

SYTMPTOMS

The most common symptom of osteoarthritis is pain in the shoulder during motion activities. People with shoulder pain usually compensate by limiting their use of the shoulder.

As a result of the cartilage degeneration, the shoulder loses its flexibility and strength, and may result in the formation of bone spurs. Finally, as the condition worsens, the pain may be present at all times, even during non weight-bearing activities.

SYMPTOMs

The primary symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis are similar to osteoarthritis and include pain, swelling and the loss of motion.

In addition, other symptoms may include loss of appetite, fever, energy loss, anemia, and rheumatoid nodules (lumps of tissue under the skin). People suffering with rheumatoid arthritis commonly have periods of exacerbation or “flare ups” where multiple joints may be painful and stiff.

TREATMENT

Dr. Ortega doctor may recommend various non-surgical therapies prior to a shoulder replacement if needed. An exercise-conditioning program may be instituted to improve the strength and flexibility of the shoulder and the other upper extremity joints.

Lifestyle and activity modification may be undertaken in an attempt to minimize the activities that are associated with shoulder pain. Various medications such as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and/or nutritional supplements (Chondroitin/Glucosamine) may reduce pain and inflammation

treatment

Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis may involve medications such as NSAIDs, aspirin and analgesics. Corticosteroids, such as prednisone may be prescribed, and are effective in decreasing the inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis may involve medications such as NSAIDs, aspirin and analgesics. Corticosteroids, such as prednisone may be prescribed, and are effective in decreasing the inflammation associated with rheumatoid arthritis.

What Makes Up Your Hip?

hip anatomy

The hip is a ball and socket joint, uniting the femur (thigh bone) with the pelvis, and functions as one of the most important joints in the human body. Designed for both mobility and stability, the hip allows the leg to move in three planes of motion, while also providing an important shock absorption function to the torso and upper body. A healthy hip allows the leg to move forwards, backwards, side to side, and rotate right and left painlessly.

The information listed on this site is common guidance and is not meant as medical advice. Every patient’s case is unique and each patient should follow his or her doctor’s specific instructions. Please discuss nutrition, medication and treatment options with your doctor to make sure you are getting the proper care for your particular situation.

All information provided on this website is for information purposes only. Please see a healthcare professional for medical advice. If you are seeking this information in an emergency situation, please call 911 and seek emergency help.

All materials copyright © 2015 Smith & Nephew, All Rights Reserved.

F.A.Q.’s

Q. I understand there is a hip replacement procedure using an anterior approach and a special surgical table that is minimally invasive. Can you explain what it is and whether it is an option for total hip replacement?

Many techniques and procedures can be used for total hip arthroplasty (hip replacement surgery), however, direct anterior total hip arthroplasty is the only surgical method that allows the surgery to be performed without having to cut any of the muscles or tendons of this hip that are so critical for hip function. It is the most tissue-preserving approach for total hip arthroplasty.

During an anterior hip replacement, the patient is lying on their back in the supine position and the leg is extended and rotated such that just the portion of the hip to be replaced is exposed without damaging the important hip muscles.
Dr. Ortega uses a specialized orthopaedic surgical table called a Hana table. The table permits a more controlled surgery with less tissue damage.

Q2. What are some of your patients’ experiences following their anterior hip replacement?

Dr. Ortega’s patients have had a wide variety of experiences in the post-operative period, however, most commonly his patients find an early rapid recovery and a majority of patients don’t need a walker within one to two weeks following surgery. In fact, many of Dr. Ortega’s patients return for their first post-operative at two weeks follow-up visit with a cane or without any assistive devices.

Most patients are discharged from the hospital one to three days after surgery. Secondary to the anterior approach, Dr. Ortega preserves muscles and tendons during the surgery, so patients leave the hospital with no restrictions after surgery and they experience less pain and walk without limp in days rather than weeks after surgery.

Dr. Ortega’s patients many times will tell him that having their hip replacement done by him while utilizing the anterior approach was the best decision they had ever made.

Videos

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History of Total Hip Replacement Surgery

Hip replacements in the United States have traditionally been performed through the traditional posterior approach. Only a small percentage of surgeons perform hip replacement using the Anterior Approach. However, both the anterior approach and anterior approach hip...

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Every year TELEMUNDO Arizona and the Arizona Hispanic Chamber of Commerce recognizes a company that the public believes has had a positive impact on our community, implemented innovative practices, stands out as an entrepreneurial company and that shows an economic...

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Sonoran Orthopaedic Trauma Surgeons
3126 N. Civic Center Plaza
Scottsdale, AZ USA 85251
info@sonoranorthotrauma.com

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